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Subtraction with Renaming

Trading to Rename

Standards for Math Practice 4

We have moved on to subtraction with renaming (2.NBT.7). I’ve been doing a lot of this work with students in small groups and it’s amazing  to see students talking and thinking about making trades, or renaming numbers. In a small group full of dialogue, students physically traded one of the ten rods that makes up 60 for 10 unit so they can more easily subtract 13. We talked about the value of 60 at the start, during and after the trade. Students giggled about how I could still buy exactly 60 $1 ice cream cones- no more, no less; at every phase of the trade. They knew that whether 60 was composed of 6 ten rods (60+0) or 5 ten rods and 10 unit cubes (50+10), its value remained constant. We worked through a few more bare number problems that also required renaming to get more ones and I really emphasized how accurately our recording matched their physical manipulation of the base ten blocks as well as their thinking. Students recorded on white boards, just as I had… and I expected we were good to go! Not so fast. About 1/3 of my students were not able to demonstrate their learning with much independence… even with 60-13. Even if I talked about ice cream cones. These students seemed to rely heavily on the scaffolding that came from our discussion throughout the trading process.  So, I decided they needed a trading center- a place where they could be successful and independent with the skills that this high level work demanded. Here are some of the recording sheets that are guiding their work. I needed them to build confidence and more deeply conceptualize the equality of the value of the numbers they were composing, both before and after renaming. They needed to deepen their understanding that values can be represented in multiple ways. After observing students’ success with this work in centers, I realized this center had potential value for all of my students. It provides an opportunity for students to focus on and practice their recording, outside of the context of the subtraction problem itself.  Additionally, it is forcing some of my higher level students to build, revisiting a more concrete experience with numbers. This helps me prepare them to rename to get more tens, hundreds etc. They are finding the challenge numbers particularly fun to work with, and I appreciate the opportunity for students to grapple with these situations in isolation, as opposed to in the context of a subtraction problem. Having this more isolated experience, makes them more confident, and less distracted by the challenge in the midst of a problem.

K-2 Centers

Dear Teachers,

Thank you for attending today’s work session on using centers in the primary classroom!

Here are the links and documents I promised you. I hope you find them helpful.  My favorite website for literacy centers is the Florida Center for Reading Research. It is amazing because the skills are organized by grade level and common core standard. To create math centers I always visit Mathematics Coaching Consortium and K-5 Math Teaching Resources. What I love about visiting these sites is that I get a crystal clear picture of what the skill I am trying to teach looks like at a variety of grade levels. Here are some of the documents we used in today’s session. The first video we watched is one of my favorites from The Teaching Channel and is called Creating A Safe and Positive Classroom. I would love to know what you thought of today’s session and how implementing centers in your classroom is impacting student learning! Let me know by leaving a comment!

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One reason this was such a successful session was your honesty. Your willingness to put your concerns, apprehensions and fears on the table right from the start helped us map a course together that met everyone’s needs.

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You came in knowing you were doing what was best for your students- for so many reasons & in so many ways! With dedication like this, it’s no wonder you were collaborating at 6:00 at night!

 

 

 

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Station Teaching

Lately, many of the teachers I support have been expressing a desire to take risks with new and different teaching strategies. One strategy many teachers are investigating is station teaching. Over the next two weeks I will attempt to respond to their needs as best I can through group work sessions, classroom observations and modeling.

Here are some videos from Teaching Channel.com that provide examples!

Algebra Example             Geometry Example

Here are the documents we used in one workshop with high school math teachers:

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At the Application Station, teachers considered embedding authentic, real world situations into math tasks. Collaborating with the Physics teachers is on this group’s list of next steps.

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After setting a purpose for their work, these math teachers watched the videos linked to in this post looking for strategies they could use in their own classrooms.

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Here at the Manipulation Station, teachers investigated new math kits they will have access to in their classrooms. They focused on incorporating manipulatives into as many concepts as possible. The green tent card lets the facilitators know they are “going strong and need no assistance.” Some teachers plan to use the green, yellow and red tent cards during their stations to increase students’ independence.

  Signs for Stations           Station Descriptions & Planning Sheets

Norms to Post               Sample Rotation/ Map      10 Principles

Here are some great links to resources that may support your work:

Math Coaches Consortium       Dare to Differentiate    Mathematics Assessment Project

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