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Student learning is no accident!

How do your students self-asses?

Lately, I’ve found myself having conversations with many educators who think self-assessment is a good idea… but just aren’t sure about putting it into practice. Consequences of thoughtful self-assessment:

1. Students reflect on their process, performance, actions.

2. Students become more aware of their learning and/ or actions- in the moment!! “Johnny, don’t you ever think before you speak?!?” (which never has any impact, BTW) —-> “Johnny, I noticed you stopped yourself  before responding to Maria (how responsible of you)… tell me a little about your thinking.

3.  Students begin using on the language of the self-assessment in their classroom dialogue. (And I wasn’t even trying to teach content specific vocabulary!!)

Here’s a Scientist’s Self Assessment I plan to use this week in a third grade science class. You’ll notice I’ve embedded a home-school communication component as well!

Here’s a Self and Group Assessment Tool I created and have used successfully with grades 4-8 to encourage academic discussions.

Here’s part of a Behavior Chart Self Monitor program my teammate and I have used for a few years now. We tweak it regularly… The weekly self-assessment and twice quarterly goal setting have really strengthened student- family conversations around progress at school. We use the data (student-collected) as the basis of our Student-Led Family Conferences.

 

Before Open House, we complete this Personal Responsibility Self Assessment on our team. Then, at Open House, we weave in some of the elements of Personal Responsibility that we plan to encourage during the school year in our talks with families. We revisit this list often throughout the year, students add new ideas to it and we track our progress.

Here’s another self-assessment that supports student reflection and analysis around Quality of Work. I like to use it on days that we add work to our portfolios.

I hope you’ll consider trying these out! Modify them to meet your needs and please let me know how they impact your students’ learning.

How are you encouraging reflection, goal-setting and self-assessment?

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SPIDER Web Discussion Strategy

Whether you teach math, social studies or general music- if you want to facilitate truly student-led inquiry in your classroom discussions, you may want to give Alexis Wiggins’ version of the SPIDER Web Discussion strategy a try. She has been refining this strategy for seven years and shares her experiences and her rubrics!

While students are the ones discussing, the teacher is still the referee and master of knowledge, offering up the right question at the right moment, redirecting the conversation, correcting misunderstandings, and ensuring that students are being civil to one another.

Maybe that lesson you have planned for Tuesday of next week needs a kick… Try adding this strategy to your repertoire, and let us know how it goes!!

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My Favorite Questioning Resource

As I look at many of the available web resources out there on questioning, I just can’t find one clearer or more to the point than this one from the Tulare County Office of Education. The best part is about halfway down the page, and is titled, “ELA CCSS Bookmarks.” The tittle is fitting I think, because just like when you bookmark a page- what you need is right there. All you need to do is click on your grade level and an amazing pdf opens with a Cliffs Notes style version (my favorite) of the English Language Arts Common Core Standards. Among other helpful pieces of information, for each standard two very important things are listed: Read More

Improving Questioning & Discussion Techniques- 1 week Challenge

Let’s think about where we are starting! If you missed the rubrics I posted yesterday, you may want to check them out.

Level 1: Questions are rapid-fire,and convergent,with single correct answers. All discussion is between teacher and students; students are not invited to speak directly to one another. -> Level 2: The teacher frames some questions designed to promote student thinking, but only a few students are involved. The teacher invites students to respond directly to one another’s ideas, but few students respond. -> Level 3: The teacher uses open-ended questions, inviting students to think and/or have multiple possible answers. Discussions enable students to talk to one another, without ongoing mediation by the teacher.-> Level 4: Students initiate higher-order questions. Students extend the discussion, enriching it. Students invite comments from their classmates during a discussion.
With these descriptors in mind, which level would you say best describes your daily teaching experiences?
Next, consider the difference between your current level and the next level? What is described in the next level that is not in your current level? Knowing this will help you set a goal to make purposeful, explicit change that is directly connected to these indicators.
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