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Student learning is no accident!

Subtraction with Renaming

Trading to Rename

Standards for Math Practice 4

We have moved on to subtraction with renaming (2.NBT.7). I’ve been doing a lot of this work with students in small groups and it’s amazing  to see students talking and thinking about making trades, or renaming numbers. In a small group full of dialogue, students physically traded one of the ten rods that makes up 60 for 10 unit so they can more easily subtract 13. We talked about the value of 60 at the start, during and after the trade. Students giggled about how I could still buy exactly 60 $1 ice cream cones- no more, no less; at every phase of the trade. They knew that whether 60 was composed of 6 ten rods (60+0) or 5 ten rods and 10 unit cubes (50+10), its value remained constant. We worked through a few more bare number problems that also required renaming to get more ones and I really emphasized how accurately our recording matched their physical manipulation of the base ten blocks as well as their thinking. Students recorded on white boards, just as I had… and I expected we were good to go! Not so fast. About 1/3 of my students were not able to demonstrate their learning with much independence… even with 60-13. Even if I talked about ice cream cones. These students seemed to rely heavily on the scaffolding that came from our discussion throughout the trading process.  So, I decided they needed a trading center- a place where they could be successful and independent with the skills that this high level work demanded. Here are some of the recording sheets that are guiding their work. I needed them to build confidence and more deeply conceptualize the equality of the value of the numbers they were composing, both before and after renaming. They needed to deepen their understanding that values can be represented in multiple ways. After observing students’ success with this work in centers, I realized this center had potential value for all of my students. It provides an opportunity for students to focus on and practice their recording, outside of the context of the subtraction problem itself.  Additionally, it is forcing some of my higher level students to build, revisiting a more concrete experience with numbers. This helps me prepare them to rename to get more tens, hundreds etc. They are finding the challenge numbers particularly fun to work with, and I appreciate the opportunity for students to grapple with these situations in isolation, as opposed to in the context of a subtraction problem. Having this more isolated experience, makes them more confident, and less distracted by the challenge in the midst of a problem.

Respect & Rapport… starts with us!

What better way to develop an Environment of Respect and Rapport than by developing a 1:1 relationship with each student??Watch Rick connect with students about their reading during conferences. What does he do/ say that develops an environment of respect and rapport? What does Rick communicate to his students with his verbal and non-verbal language? I’ve seen similar successes with Experimental Design Conferences in a middle school science class as well as Think Tank conferences in a high school math class. In each instance, teachers demonstrated great respect for their students’ thinking by honoring scheduled time with everyone. How could you make something like this work in your context? What do you & your students stand to gain?

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Dittos & Worksheets & Packets, Oh my!!

So, your school department actually has a manual for you and it’s full of printables… They were designed by educators and statisticians… and people that must know more about teaching this content than you do… so why aren’t you students engaged? Well, I am writing this post to make sure you don’t “throw out the baby with the bath water!” Before you throw away every workbook and ditto in your classroom… let’s put our heads together.

You are right, experts did design these materials, so there’s probably something that works in here…

 Don’t reinvent the wheel- Re-purpose it instead!

Here’s a template for a cube (as well as other amazing ideas- amazing wiki). Why not put the best questions from your packet on the 6 sides of the cube and let students roll and discuss in pairs? Your goal (with the packet) was for students to think about the questions, right? Imagine all the ideas they’ll get from their partner when rolling the cube??!! Two heads are always better than one.

You could listen in on student conversations and assess their Speaking & Listening Skills or their content knowledge. Another idea is to assess student learning with an exit slip at the end of class. When you encourage students to have conversations, arm them with sentence stems and accountable talk to make it as productive as possible.

What will you re-purpose this week? Let us know in the comments & you may inspire someone else to take a similar risk!

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PS… I’m looking to give away a TpT gift certificate to a lucky blog commenter this week! Spread the word- bring a friend!

Student Engagement… Strategy #1

Jigsaw it! jigsaw

Regardless of the subject, brain research tells us we need many rehearsals (+20…yikes!) for new learning to stick! Learners rehearse learning when they are actually engaged in it. And, just to be clear… a worksheet with 20 math problems does not equal 20 rehearsals…( awwww, maaaan!) So, let’s consider the value of a jigsaw!

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Student Engagement… Buzz Words Demystified

According to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21), the 4Cs: Critical thinking and problem solving, Communication, Collaboration, and Creativity and Innovation are infused in learning.

Watch and listen to how ASCD describes 21st Century Skills. 21st_Buzz_word

In the video P21’s video library, the section titled “In Practice,” features sample lessons incorporating 21st Century Skills for any grade level/ content area. This is a video jackpot! I’d love to know what videos you found most valuable and to which you made connections. Please share your thoughts in the comments!

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Carol Ann Tomlinson writes, “The idea of differentiating instruction to accommodate the different ways that students learn involves a hefty dose of common sense, as well as sturdy support in the theory and research of education (Tomlinson & Allan, 2000). It is an approach to teaching that advocates active planning for student differences in classrooms.”

The teacher in this video creates an opportunity for all students to be successful with a very challenging written assignment. Watch this 5 minutes video to see what he does to support all students. Any ideas or questions come to mind for your own teaching? Share in the comments!

In my upcoming posts, look for go-to strategies to ramp up already planned lessons and ways to re-purpose assignments, lessons and resources that need a 21st Century kick! Also during this challenge, a lucky teacher who supports readers by sharing his/her experience in the comments will receive a TpT gift certificate!!

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Student Engagement- Week 2 Educator Challenge

If you are back for round two… congratulations on your successes during week one! If you’re just joining us, welcome~ we’re thrilled to have you here and hope you join the conversation! Let’s think about where we are starting!

Level 1: Projects, activities and assignments lack challenge, are inappropriate, or do not cognitively engage students. -> Level 2: Projects, activities and assignments inconsistently challenge all students appropriately and only cognitively engage some students. -> Level 3: Projects, activities and assignments are appropriately challenging for all students, require 21st century skills, and cognitively engage almost all students in complex learning. -> Level 4: Projects, activities, and assignments are appropriately challenging for all students, require 21st century skills, and cognitively engage student in complex learning.

With these descriptors in mind, which level would you say best describes your daily teaching experiences? Read More

My Favorite Questioning Resource

As I look at many of the available web resources out there on questioning, I just can’t find one clearer or more to the point than this one from the Tulare County Office of Education. The best part is about halfway down the page, and is titled, “ELA CCSS Bookmarks.” The tittle is fitting I think, because just like when you bookmark a page- what you need is right there. All you need to do is click on your grade level and an amazing pdf opens with a Cliffs Notes style version (my favorite) of the English Language Arts Common Core Standards. Among other helpful pieces of information, for each standard two very important things are listed: Read More

Station Teaching

Lately, many of the teachers I support have been expressing a desire to take risks with new and different teaching strategies. One strategy many teachers are investigating is station teaching. Over the next two weeks I will attempt to respond to their needs as best I can through group work sessions, classroom observations and modeling.

Here are some videos from Teaching Channel.com that provide examples!

Algebra Example             Geometry Example

Here are the documents we used in one workshop with high school math teachers:

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At the Application Station, teachers considered embedding authentic, real world situations into math tasks. Collaborating with the Physics teachers is on this group’s list of next steps.

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After setting a purpose for their work, these math teachers watched the videos linked to in this post looking for strategies they could use in their own classrooms.

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Here at the Manipulation Station, teachers investigated new math kits they will have access to in their classrooms. They focused on incorporating manipulatives into as many concepts as possible. The green tent card lets the facilitators know they are “going strong and need no assistance.” Some teachers plan to use the green, yellow and red tent cards during their stations to increase students’ independence.

  Signs for Stations           Station Descriptions & Planning Sheets

Norms to Post               Sample Rotation/ Map      10 Principles

Here are some great links to resources that may support your work:

Math Coaches Consortium       Dare to Differentiate    Mathematics Assessment Project

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