My Favorite Questioning Resource

As I look at many of the available web resources out there on questioning, I just can’t find one clearer or more to the point than this one from the Tulare County Office of Education. The best part is about halfway down the page, and is titled, “ELA CCSS Bookmarks.” The tittle is fitting I think, because just like when you bookmark a page- what you need is right there. All you need to do is click on your grade level and an amazing pdf opens with a Cliffs Notes style version (my favorite) of the English Language Arts Common Core Standards. Among other helpful pieces of information, for each standard two very important things are listed: Continue reading “My Favorite Questioning Resource”

Improving Questioning & Discussion Techniques- 1 week Challenge

Let’s think about where we are starting! If you missed the rubrics I posted yesterday, you may want to check them out.

Level 1: Questions are rapid-fire,and convergent,with single correct answers. All discussion is between teacher and students; students are not invited to speak directly to one another. -> Level 2: The teacher frames some questions designed to promote student thinking, but only a few students are involved. The teacher invites students to respond directly to one another’s ideas, but few students respond. -> Level 3: The teacher uses open-ended questions, inviting students to think and/or have multiple possible answers. Discussions enable students to talk to one another, without ongoing mediation by the teacher.-> Level 4: Students initiate higher-order questions. Students extend the discussion, enriching it. Students invite comments from their classmates during a discussion.
With these descriptors in mind, which level would you say best describes your daily teaching experiences?
Next, consider the difference between your current level and the next level? What is described in the next level that is not in your current level? Knowing this will help you set a goal to make purposeful, explicit change that is directly connected to these indicators.

K-2 Centers

Dear Teachers,

Thank you for attending today’s work session on using centers in the primary classroom!

Here are the links and documents I promised you. I hope you find them helpful.  My favorite website for literacy centers is the Florida Center for Reading Research. It is amazing because the skills are organized by grade level and common core standard. To create math centers I always visit Mathematics Coaching Consortium and K-5 Math Teaching Resources. What I love about visiting these sites is that I get a crystal clear picture of what the skill I am trying to teach looks like at a variety of grade levels. Here are some of the documents we used in today’s session. The first video we watched is one of my favorites from The Teaching Channel and is called Creating A Safe and Positive Classroom. I would love to know what you thought of today’s session and how implementing centers in your classroom is impacting student learning! Let me know by leaving a comment!

photo 2-1
One reason this was such a successful session was your honesty. Your willingness to put your concerns, apprehensions and fears on the table right from the start helped us map a course together that met everyone’s needs.

photo 3-1

You came in knowing you were doing what was best for your students- for so many reasons & in so many ways! With dedication like this, it’s no wonder you were collaborating at 6:00 at night!

 

 

 

Marker_Signature