Classroom Teacher: Reality Check

The view from down here.
“It all falls on the classroom teacher, it always does” she reminded me. This was my mother. A retired elementary school teacher, who had made it the long haul. In the classroom for her entire career, advocating for kids, mentoring new teachers- reminding me when I express frustration in the system that, I shouldn’t be surprised because “other people just don’t get it. Everything is the responsibility of the classroom teacher.” In other words- s#!t rolls down hill. I’ve been hearing it for years. But, honestly I didn’t quite get it until recently.
I’ve spent most of my career as a middle school teacher. I guess I have that genetic mutation that appreciates the sass and limit-testing of the adolescent. Continue reading “Classroom Teacher: Reality Check”

Teaching with Online Discussions

I decided early this year that I have a responsibility to improve the quality of online discussions. As a teacher, I often feel responsible to improve the world I live in. Knowing each year, that I will spend so many hours every day with so many impressionable, mold-able citizens of the future- can sometimes feel like a lot of pressure. I know my time working on digital citizenship is well spent though, because my students have digital footprints that are growing faster than they are!

IMG_2958
Teaching students to have respectful, productive academic discussions online follows the same construct as teaching anything else. Students need to be taught explicitly. Students need clear, timely feedback. Students need to play an active role in creating/ designing the expectations. Students need to be exposed to and evaluate samples of the work they are being asked to create. Continue reading “Teaching with Online Discussions”

The Wait is Over

What a productive week it has been… in terms of my thinking. I feel like I have made incredible progress, even though nothing tangible has happened… yet! I knew before this school year began that I wanted to get my students blogging. I also knew I was in love with the idea of Genius Hour. Here it is, January- and I cannot check either off of my To Do list. I feel confident though, that all of that will change for me this week. And the best part is, that once we begin, forward motion will ensue no matter what. What happened in the last week to push me forward from dreaming to doing? Just right collaboration, and faith… that’s what! A couple of months ago I brought my nagging “I really want to have a genius hour” plea to my high school teacher friend, who was further along in the process than me. I listened to her stories, her “what I’d do next times” and gained confidence as she reflected. Continue reading “The Wait is Over”

PD or Infomercial?

After hearing/ reading the unrelenting enthusiasm of my colleagues who have attended ‘edcamps’ and ‘unconferences,’ I determined I needed to experience this phenomenon for myself. Could it really be that everyone who attended these events got exactly what they wanted and more? People who had experienced unconference-style events reported feeling professionally satisfied, respected and invigorated.
My attitude is generally pretty ‘glass-half-full…’ maybe even mostly full. This however, seemed too good to be true. I’ve watched enough late night infomercials to know that when something sounds like a win-win, and costs only 4 easy payments of $49.95 (a much better deal than $200)- your best move is to change the channel.
products as seen on tv
I’ve tested that theory a few times just to be sure, and my juicer, food dehydrator and wavy hair-maker all insist- my theory is correct (too good to be true). In the name of research however, I thought I should look a little more deeply into this idea of no-cost, participant led, free-learning that everyone was raving about.
My research told me that the closest edcamp event to me wasn’t until August, so I needed to get creative if I was going to get to the bottom of all this hype.
I decided my colleagues’ constant quest for knowledge, might provide an opportunity to bring the research specimen directly to me! Some of my (amazing) colleagues had been exposed to a variety of tech tools while coaching around the state this year- and their interest was peaked. “I just need time to sit and let someone show me this without pressure,” said one coach as she was getting to know Drop Box. Another asked again, “Can’t we just put some time aside so that the people who are using Twitter can help the rest of us get started? They’re learning so much!” The teacher in me heard: “I am ready- teach me now!” The conspiracy theorist in me wondered, “did someone pay them to ask that? Are they like the live studio audience at the taping of an infomercial?” Nevertheless, my wheels were turning!
The teacher in me won out. I networked with two other coaches to explore how we might utilize an unconference style format to meet the very diverse learning interests of our colleagues. We took our cues from David Wees, who has posted valuable details about Edcamp Vancouver, and linked to Kristen Swanson’s TED talk about organizing Edcamp Philly.

Shawn Rubin, who organizes EdCampRI (which is coming up in October-yes!!), was also key in supporting the event by sharing his insight and reflections, as we found ourselves looking for answers. It’s so helpful to talk to someone who has done something before, pick their brain about the logistics you just don’t read about in an article or blog post, and breathe a sigh of relief, realizing it’ll all work out. And it did!
Our unconference was small- about 35 participants in all. But, it yielded some serious learning. You can see pictures and comments Tweeted that day on our Storify.
Upon reflection, it seems like those educators who told me how great their experiences at unconferences were telling the truth… I guess they weren’t paid actors, like I suspect everyone in the studio audience of an infomercial is. I shouldn’t be surprised. Educators are dying to learn new strategies to engage students and families… on their own terms! Engagement at the unconference was high- really high. At one point, we tried to interrupt learning to transition to the next session… and it just didn’t happen. No one wanted to stop their learning conversation for a minute. For me- that was the highlight of the day! My brain was fried when the day was over. I learned SO much. And, I’ve been playing with the new tools and tricks I picked up that day…a lot.

Brain map
Unfortunately, not everyone who wanted to attend was able. In fact, a few people who we really wanted to share this experience with, couldn’t make it on June 26- which was kind of a bummer. Then, though people started asking, “when’s the next one?” which led us to wonder if there might be a next one. Maybe my research isn’t done yet. Maybe June 26th is a little like the first month I had my juicer, before it was relegated to the way back of the cabinet to collect dust. I should probably experience more unconferences before I draw any conclusions. And maybe, I should dust off that juicer in the meantime.
Juicers

Week 4 Challenge: Assessment in Instruction

Dear Teachers,

Thanks for wanting to jump back in with us as we dig into Assessment in Instruction! This is the last of the 4 challenges- and I know you’ll finish strong! To get started, think about which level you feel most accurately describes your daily teaching experiences…

Level 1: There is little or no assessment or monitoring of student earning; feedback is absent, or of poor quality. Students do not appear to be aware of the assessment criteria and do not engage in self-assessment. There is no attempt to adjust the lesson as a result of assessment. -> Level 2: Assessment is sporadically used to support instruction through some teacher and/ or student monitoring of progress of learning. Feedback to students is general, and students appear to be only partially aware of the assessment criteria; few assess their own work. Questions/ prompts/ assessments are rarely used to diagnose evidence of learning. Adjustment to the lesson in response to the assessment is minimal or ineffective. -> Level 3: Assessment is regularly used during instruction through teacher and/ or student monitoring of progress of learning, resulting in accurate, specific feedback that advances learning. Students appear to be aware of the assessment criteria; some of them engage in self- assessment. Questions/ prompts/ assessments are used to diagnose learning, and adjustment to instruction is made to address student misunderstandings.   -> Level 4: Assessment is fully integrated into instruction through extensive use of formative assessment. Students appear to be aware of, and there is some evidence that they have contributed to, the assessment criteria. Students self-assess and monitor their progress. A variety of feedback, from both teachers and peers, is accurate, specific, and advances learning. Questions/ prompts/ assessments are used regularly to diagnose evidence of learning, and instruction is adjusted and differentiated to address individual student misunderstandings.

There are Four Key Elements in this Component:

Assessment

Which one do you consider your strength? Is there one you will focus on most this week? Set a goal for yourself for this 1 week challenge. To increase your chances of success, make it public by sharing it in the comments. Check out my Assessment Learnist Board and my Assessment Pinterest Board to get the ideas flowing!

Let’s make it a meaningful week of growth for your students and for your practice!

Typewriter_sig

PS~ You may want to connect your thinking to the related RIDE_assessment_Rubric or I3_Assessment_rubric

 

Respect & Rapport… Naturally

I’ve been following the release of each week’s #yearatMH video clip since hearing Sam Chaltain speak at this year’s NTC Symposium. These clips are a prime example of the value of respectful relationships within, around and between members of a school community. If you haven’t watched one yet, make today the day. I believe these videos to be powerful on so many levels, not the least of which is shaping our expectations (& those of non-educators) of school culture. Share with a parent and watch how quickly they find themselves able to articulate what they want from their child’s school! Think too as you watch and listen, about what pieces of this experience you can bring into your classroom. What do you notice about the language of learning (both verbal and non verbal)? How do adults and students show respect for each other, the school and learning? Happy viewing! I hope this is your first if many visits to this site!!
~Alicia

Student Engagement- Week 2 Educator Challenge

If you are back for round two… congratulations on your successes during week one! If you’re just joining us, welcome~ we’re thrilled to have you here and hope you join the conversation! Let’s think about where we are starting!

Level 1: Projects, activities and assignments lack challenge, are inappropriate, or do not cognitively engage students. -> Level 2: Projects, activities and assignments inconsistently challenge all students appropriately and only cognitively engage some students. -> Level 3: Projects, activities and assignments are appropriately challenging for all students, require 21st century skills, and cognitively engage almost all students in complex learning. -> Level 4: Projects, activities, and assignments are appropriately challenging for all students, require 21st century skills, and cognitively engage student in complex learning.

With these descriptors in mind, which level would you say best describes your daily teaching experiences? Continue reading “Student Engagement- Week 2 Educator Challenge”